Books (2)

Eat, Pray, Love

by Elizabeth Gilbert 

A  wonderful gift from a friend, i can indeed say that the book  really does capture ” a  woman’s search for everything”.  I actually read the  book while i was waiting in line for different bureaucratic procedures, and i can say that time flew.

In times of desperation is when we need friends the most. But, we need hope the most. Life is too short to waste it on regrets and on clinging to the past –  and even if the journey is filled with obstacles, that only makes the destination a lot more attractive.

It is a book i so sincere, so open and so colored. Simple, and yet sophisticated. The movie with the same name does not really do the book any justice –  it just tries to capture all the  emotions of the book but, in my opinion, fails.

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A Hundred Years of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

 There is no dialogue in the book.

I got completely drawn into the atmosphere of the book –  and i started reading it on a day i was not feeling 100%. It  is highly motivational, but in a weird sense –  all if does is tell a story ( quite a few, actually) and there are a lot of things that  any of us can relate to. It is simple, yet so complex that sometimes it is hard to keep on track. It makes one think outside the box, for non of us are alone, even in the most desperate of situations, there   is a light at the end of the tunnel. And that light usually comes from the window  of our homes.

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The House of the Sisters

by Charlotte Link

It starts like  a typical novel –  cheesy and predictable,  but it becomes so much more really fast. I was actually reading it during my holiday in Rome with my sister, and on the beach, there was another woman reading the same book  –  just a weird coincidence :)

The book is a bit of a biography : early 20th century, war, movement of the “suffragette”, riots. Both educational and motivational, it is a book for the  weak sex –  as it shows us that we are not at all weak. 

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Into a million little pieces

by James Frey

Those who enjoyed TRAINSPOTTING  will enjoy this book.

It does not tell you not to do drugs. It does not tell you they are bad.  The book is just about an extreme case of drug and  other substances addiction. And it is not pretty.

Even when one thinks there  is nothing left, there is  something. Hope. Love. Dedication.

 

Books (1)

Social Economics / Globalization

“The McDonaldization of Society”                  

  by George Ritzer

Partlyabout McDonalds, its history and philosophy, it is a book that invites you to stop and think about where you are going before you actually get a chance to get there. McDonalds is not just a fast -food company –  it more and more becomes our way of life. We are taught to do everything faster, be more efficient, do not  waste time, use every resource. We are educated to  lead a standardized life. Yes, it is more efficient. But is that the  real purpose of it all ?

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 “The World is Flat –  A brief history of the Twenty-first century”

by Thomas Friedman

My first social economics book. I just found it on a table in the library, and then took it home.

The world is changing and technology makes all the difference.  Things that were unthinkable are increasingly becoming possible.  Globalization is an on-going  phenomenon that is both positive and not.  Yes, we do become more synchronized, more connected, we all have the chance to share our ideas , to show our originality. But in the process, aren’t we also becoming more alike , as languages, cultures and traditions converge?

Society is no longer what it used to be.  And soon, it won’t be what it is now.

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The Black Swan 

by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

  The impact of the Highly Improbable.

“The book focuses on the extreme impact of certain kinds of rare and unpredictable events (outliers) and humans’ tendency to find simplistic explanations for these events retrospectively, after the fact. This theory has since become known as the black swan theory. “( wiki)

I found it a bit difficult to read, as the terms were a bit too technical. Yet i lasted past the middle of it :)

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     Googlization of Everything (and why we should worry)

        by  Siva Vaidhyanathan

    It is about what one thinks it’s about. How the availability of data does not mean that we actually acces any of it. How nothing that we do is private anymore. How the world is changing and how we allow it to. And about Google as a company.

I only read half of it, and i do not think i will get back to it. Ideas started to repeat themselves, and the narration became a bit too heavy. Or maybe i just expected something else.

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    Freakonomics / Super-Freakonomics 

     by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner 

I find social economics a very interesting topic.   And while to some it  may be obvious that incentives are what drives human behaviour, both book 1 and 2 offer examples of such incentives that few people might have considered. The books also ask some interesting questions, like Does Good Parenting really matter? And, are humans  altruistic ? I could have said no  to the last one  immediately, but i had no idea that until recently, behavioral economics considered people as giving more than taking.

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 The Big Switch

by Nicholas Carr

It was actually a book that we had to read for a course, but i enjoyed it as it was similar to the other books of social economics ( or bla bla bla , as other people call them) books.

Yes, we are one of the last generations that know what it was like to stay at home in order to receive a phonecall, we are among the last ones to know what life was like before…. internet. Just like our ancestors knew what it was like before electricity. And yes, we now live in a completely different world.

Yes, i still read ….

… something other than Facebook status updates. Sometimes.

When i was younger i used to read a lot more. I remember going to the school library even when i was too short to reach higher than the second shelf.

At that time i really enjoyed reading fairy-tales, and then i moved to Alexandre Dumas and Anne&Serge Golon, with the Angelique series. Novels of passed times – perfect for 15 year old girls –  with stories of

As a young girl i really enjoyed the novels of passed times – with their beautiful dresses and fancy hair styles, with the handsome gentlemen that took them out for walks in the flowery gardens, with maids that gossiped all day long…

Then came Agatha Cristie with Hercule Poirot in Murder on the Orient Express ( which i did not expressly like) and And Then There Were None ( or Ten Little Niggers ) that i really enjoyed.

Of course, just as the next girl i quickly shuffled through some Jane Austen books.

Among the Romanian authors, i especially enjoyed the works of Camil Petrescu ( Patul lui Procust, Ultima Noapte de Dragoste, Intiia Noapte de Razboi), Marin Preda ( Cel mai iubit dintre Paminteni) and Liviu Rebreanu ( Ion ). Most of the latter readings were compulsory, but as a highschool student, there was barely any time left for other literature ( an excuse, i know).

Then there came a pause …. not because of less time, but because other means of entertainment were available – TV and Internet. Social Network Pages on Faces.md and chatting on Mirc , watching MTV – other excuses not to read.

Still, i got back to the habit of turning book pages outside the university curriculum. I admit that 1 book per month is not a milestone i’ve hit, but now that i have an e-book reader, i am kinda all out of excuses not to read :)